Monster Prom Review

Dating simulators are a genre of conflicting sensibilities.  On the one hand, we’re encouraged to immerse ourselves in the absurdist high school fantasies, ludicrous fan-service, and never-ending conflicts over waifus and husbandos.  In other words, there’s a general lack of self-seriousness to the proceedings.  However, this immersion is all but lost when you realize that – in many titles in the genre – everyone loves you by default.  Even if you “lose”, you’ll still end up with someone, even if they weren’t your first choice.  Before you know it, making decisions becomes an automatic process, requiring only a cursory glance at the options to determine which has the best chance of leading to intimacy.

SeaBed Review – There’s Such a Thing as Going Too Deep

While it’s cliché to say that a game is “challenging to review”, I think that it’s fair to apply such a statement to SeaBed, due to one simple fact: it isn’t a game. It’s a visual novel (VN) in the truest sense of the word; there’s text that can be advanced with a click or set to auto-read, and pictures complement said text. Some VNs attempt to shake up the formula by adding dialogue choices or additional gameplay elements, giving the player a break from the ever-advancing walls of text; this isn’t the case with SeaBed.