The Mooseman Review

“Edutainment” is a term that’s gotten a bad rap over time, conjuring up memories of Mario Teaches Typing, Carmen Sandiego, and even the dreaded Mavis Beacon titles.  However, the genre has evolved recently, to the point where the gameplay component is frequently fleshed out and enjoyable, rather than being a mere afterthought.  Take a title like Mulaka, which exists as both an educational piece and a highly entertaining video game.  Developers are realizing that – to keep people engaged with the game’s subject matter – they have to keep them interested in the game.  Plus, even if the inclusion of so much gameplay (the horror!) results in some topics being omitted, getting a taste of a new subject in an exciting atmosphere can whet one’s appetite for knowledge, leading to further research and learning being done outside of the context of the game.

(Obligatory Bob Dylan Reference)

A while back, I did a write-up entitled “The Consequences of a Full-Time Job”, in which I discussed the new job I had started and the perceived ramifications it would have on this humble blog of mine. At the time, I assumed that the only thing that would ultimately be impacted was my writing schedule. However, as time has gone on, I’ve been made painfully aware of my drastic underestimation. My writing schedule is all over the place, to the point where I no longer even feel like I can promise release dates for upcoming reviews. I keep cancelling streams at the last minute due to physical and/or emotional burnout. Hell, I’ve barely even tweeted.

While that all sounds incredibly negative, this cloud of disorganization has had a pleasant silver lining: it’s forced me to revaluate what I do, why I do it, and what it all means to me. The results may not be pleasing to all of you, but that’s the downside to doing something like this that’s ultimately for myself: sometimes I have to be selfish and do what’s right for me.

Omensight Review

Several games have attempted the Groundhog Day format, to varying degrees of success.  What tends to be the biggest stumbling block is also what makes the premise so interesting: you’re repeating the same day over and over.  From a narrative perspective, this allows the story to focus on the same events from different points of view, or see how minor changes can impact the final outcome.  However, it’s a lot harder to incorporate those subtle variations into gameplay, meaning that it’s easy to find yourself going through the same actions ad nauseum, simply to get from one story beat to another.

Replaying Journey

The first time I played through Journey, I cried.  It was – without a doubt – one of the most emotionally moving gaming experiences I had had up to that point, and it’s held a special place in my heart ever since.  However, when I mentioned to my friend Matt that it might find its way onto my “favourite games of all time” list, he made an interesting remark: “Have you replayed it?”

Monster Prom Review

Dating simulators are a genre of conflicting sensibilities.  On the one hand, we’re encouraged to immerse ourselves in the absurdist high school fantasies, ludicrous fan-service, and never-ending conflicts over waifus and husbandos.  In other words, there’s a general lack of self-seriousness to the proceedings.  However, this immersion is all but lost when you realize that – in many titles in the genre – everyone loves you by default.  Even if you “lose”, you’ll still end up with someone, even if they weren’t your first choice.  Before you know it, making decisions becomes an automatic process, requiring only a cursory glance at the options to determine which has the best chance of leading to intimacy.

Light Fall Review

Challenging games are a pain to review, and not just for the obvious reasons.  Sure, it can be difficult (and often frustrating) to throw yourself against the same obstacle repeatedly, solely because you want to see as much of a game as possible before reviewing it.  What I find to be far more stressful, however, is when that challenge becomes insurmountable.  With the recent controversies surrounding games like Cuphead, the notion of saying that a game is “unfairly difficult” is frequently regarded as taboo.  It’s not that the game is hard; it’s just that you need to “git gud”.

Masters of Anima Review

Masters of Anima is a game that takes heavy influence from cult classic titles like Pikmin, Overlord, and Little King’s Story.  I know this, despite – unfortunately – having never played any of those.  It puts me in something of an odd position when reviewing Masters of Anima, as mechanics that may feel derivative to fans of similar titles instead come across as fresh and interesting.  Subtle changes to the formula go unnoticed by me, as Masters of Anima – from my perspective – is the progenitor of that formula.  With that in mind, it should be clear that I have no thoughts on how Masters of Anima compares to its contemporaries.  That being said, taken as a standalone product, I found it to be an absolutely wonderful experience!

The Consequences of a Full-Time Job

I’ve been hinting and casually mentioning it for a while, so it’s time to come clean: I got a full-time job.  For those of you who are curious, it’s a software engineering position at Getty Images!  Like, the stock photo company?

Yeah, I’m, like, kind of a big deal now.

Crazy Dreamz: Best Of Review

Imagine if Nintendo released a compilation of the best user-created levels from Super Mario Maker as a standalone package; that’s basically Crazy Dreamz: Best Of, except it replaces all the Mario assets with magical cats and other fantasy-themed critters.  What’s most interesting is the monetization model: 50% of the profits go to the creators whose levels made it into the game.  Not only that, but each level spotlights its creator at the start and end, giving players the option to send monetary tips to their favourite builders.  It’s a rather heartwarming collaboration between developers and players, and one which I’d love to see more games explore.  However, can the creativity of an entire fanbase produce an inspired, diverse set of game levels to experience?

Assault Gunners: HD Edition Review

On paper, Assault Gunners HD seems like the perfect game for me.  Featuring a deep customisation system, fast-paced mech combat, and the Dynasty Warriors-esque satisfaction of mowing through hordes of opponents at the drop of a hat, it’s pretty much my personal power fantasy come to life.

Here comes the “but”.